SweaterKittensAhoy!
I heard you were into thigh bands. Check out these thigh bands.

I heard you were into thigh bands. Check out these thigh bands.

Who’s dumbass idea was it to make a whole cosplay. That idiot.

markdoesstuff:

tinyfrightenedanimals:

mymodernmet:

Photographer Sophie Gamand's new series Flower Power portrays pit bulls in a softer, dreamier light to highlight their sweet nature.

bugsburgers

!!!!!!!!!

Dawww! Pitties in flower crowns!

Belt! And a terrible facial expression, but oh well.

Belt! And a terrible facial expression, but oh well.

Mr. SK here with live coverage of cosplay work on this wild Saturday night. She’s swearing a lot.

Mr. SK here with live coverage of cosplay work on this wild Saturday night. She’s swearing a lot.

the-wordbutler:

This is now a thing I own. Sara did this. I cannot stop laughing. Just. LOOK AT IT. (I put it on the switch I literally never turn off. Because. Obviously.)This may be the greatest thing I will ever claim as my own.

OMG I AM PRETTY SURE THAT’S BARTROC THE LEAPER CREEPING BEHIND HIM.YEEEES.

the-wordbutler:

This is now a thing I own.

Sara did this.

I cannot stop laughing.

Just.

LOOK AT IT.

(I put it on the switch I literally never turn off. Because. Obviously.)

This may be the greatest thing I will ever claim as my own.

OMG I AM PRETTY SURE THAT’S BARTROC THE LEAPER CREEPING BEHIND HIM.

YEEEES.

geekgirlvideo:

thebicker:

foxy-green:

bencarignan:

rickybrugal:

dorkly:

Female Fantasy III

Perfecto.

perfect

May they be forever alone for their elitist douche-baggery.

I was recently interviewing the woman who founded Her Universe and we were talking specifically about women and geekdom. I asked about the rise of girls in geek culture and she very accurately corrected me: There is no “rise” of geek girls. We’ve always been here. Girls are just as nerdy as dudes are. Ladies have always been interested in sci fi and fantasy and video games - we just don’t talk about it a lot because men are assholes. 

yes.

Pretty fucking much.

hugealienpie:

Y’all, I’m so sick of stories where a white, middle class, able-bodied, neurotypical cishet dude meets a Manic Pixie Revolutionary Girl who shows him genteel, sterilized scenes of poverty and oppression to “wake his consciousness” and then falls in love with him, becoming a reward for his “enlightenment.” Who’s with me?

YOU HAVE MY AXE.

shadynaiad:

sweaterkittensahoy:

kitsune-scribe:

sweaterkittensahoy:

So help me, I swear my super power is “lose crochet hook the second you set it down.”

the fuck is that thing.

Some people believe in inanimate objects. These people are called non-crafters.

It’s so fucking true.

I once dropped a knitting needle in a friend’s couch, and found it in my couch when I got home.  We live four hours away from each other. 

…are you a wizard? Because you might be a wizard.

alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.
High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.
But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.


I love how basically the bullshit is, “Well, yeah, MEN wore heels, but it was for PRACTICAL reasons.”No, men wore heels because it made them look pretty.

alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.

High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.

But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

I love how basically the bullshit is, “Well, yeah, MEN wore heels, but it was for PRACTICAL reasons.”

No, men wore heels because it made them look pretty.